The Guice Box

SONY DSCI have been in possession of the Guice Box for several years now. It is a well-built, sturdy, varnished box emblazoned with the Guice family crest on top and trimmed out with brass handles and latch. I came to acquire it in a roundabout way.

In 2008 my mother and I traveled with other members of my family to attend our first Guice Family Reunion held yearly near McNair, Mississippi.

My mother was so excited to go.  She had never known any of her Guice relatives beyond her father, since he had died when she was seven.  And his mother and father died before my mother’s parents were married.  So to meet other Guice “faces” and to see the family resemblance was a dream come true for her.

Sitting in folding chairs in the shade of trees in the grassy yard of the family home of a Guice relative, family members caught up on news from the previous year.  After partaking of some scrumptious family reunion food — you know the kind — my mother was chosen by a drawing to receive a small treasure chest-like box that was part of a Guice Family Reunion tradition.  The recipient was to take it home for one year and bring it back to the next reunion.  During that year, the holder of the box was to contribute a family treasure — be it a photo, recipe, Guice family story, etc.

Since I am our immediate family’s historian, my mother gave me the box so that I could add a “family treasure” and be the holder of the box it until the next reunion.

As a genealogist and historian, I had fun going through the box’s contents. There were photos, family histories, articles, and obituaries.  It was like Christmas morning discovering more Guice family history!SONY DSC

In the months to come, I worked diligently to self-publish a book about our branch of the Guice family, then I added it to the box.  I was excited to show the other Guice family members our contribution at the next reunion, but the reunion in 2009 was cancelled. We would have to wait another year.  So I put the box safely away in my genealogy cabinet.

CCI02012013_0002But before the next reunion could be held in 2010, my mother passed away. I’m not even sure that it was held that year.  I’m so sad that she was never able to attend another reunion, but I am glad that she was able to attend at least one.

Because she was the contact person for the reunion, I have not seen another invitation to attend one. There is a contact name and address under the lid of the Guice box, but I was hesitant to send the box in the mail for fear it may be lost — it, nor its contents can be replaced.  I tried to contact another Guice family member that I remembered meeting that day, leaving my information with them to let me know of the next reunion, but I have not been notified.

I hope that by posting this page, someone from the Mississippi/Louisiana Guice family will see it and contact me about the next reunion so I can return the box and the tradition can continue.  I will write a letter to the address in the box in hopes that I will get a response about the reunion.  Until then if you are a member of the Guice Family, please contact me through this blog and know that the Guice box has been well taken care of. I will come to the next reunion bearing it in one hand and food in the other!

23 thoughts on “The Guice Box

  1. I was just talking about Louisa Guice to Teddy Calhoun Friday at lunch. Every time I see him (he’s 80) he asks, “who was it again who got the land grants and married T. B. Gilbert?” I was just starting to think about writing a history of the Gilbert side of the family. I’ll include this article. Thanks!

  2. My name is Doug Leo I am a descendent of the Guice family. My great grandmother was a Guice. Would love to talk with you about family history.

  3. Hi,
    Do you still have the box? I’d love to get a good scan or close up of the crest, I had seen this crest on a xerox copy back when I was a kid, but have never been able to find a good image of it. I’d love to try to recreate it as a vector graphic.
    I’ve never been to a family reunion, other than funerals and weddings, so I unfortunately don’t know many Guices beyond the aunts and uncles.
    I’m the youngest grandchild of Olyn Tully Guice Jr (O.T. as he was called). Olyn T Guice III is my uncle and was the family president for sometime, he’s been in very poor health, but my aunt may be able to reconnect you with where the box needs to go.

      • I had posted the pic to my facebook page for some others to see, it turns out it was my uncle, Olyn, that made the box. Please feel free to friend me on facebook, I’m sure you can get to know some of our line and some others that way.

  4. I am a Guice descendant and live in Pike County which is not too far from McNair, Franklin County, MS. I’m just beginning my research into this line of the family. My great grandmother was Clara Jane Guice, daughter of Jonathan Madison Guice, son of Jacob Guice, son of Jonathan Guice, son of Christopher Guice. I’m eager to learn more and would love to make connections. Thanks!

  5. Hi, Guice family! I purchased property on Grainger Rd in McNair, MS 3 yrs ago. We were looking at old, old maps of the area and found that there was a Malcolm, MS with map coordinates very near our property. In researching info about Malcolm, we found that it was named for Malcolm Gilchrist (1776-1851). Malcolm was the Postmaster at Malcolm, his place was a stagecoach stop, and there was a railroad that went through Malcolm. In the research, I found that Malcolm Gilchrist’s great grandson Olyn Tully Guice (1884-1954) moved to the old Gilchrist place. He ran a store in front of the old home place and was a substitute mail carrier in the late 1940’s. The land East of our place is referred to as the lands of McLaurin (same name as Olyn’s grandfather who was married to Catherine Gilchirst–Malcolm’s daughter), and the land South of us is referred to as lands of Guice. I would love to see a picture of the old Malcolm Gilchrist place and store. I would love to see pics of the area when Malcolm existed and since. I understand the area had several saw mills, and most of the residents were farmers. The land consisted of pastures for raising cattle, baling hay, and growing cotton and other crops. It sure looks different now with all the pine timber growing in this area!

    • Thank you for the history lesson! I didn’t know about Malcolm. I love that part of the area is called “lands of Guice.” There were plenty of them around! I have never lived in the area, so I don’t have any old photos from there. Anyone out there know of any photos of Malcolm, MS or the area around McNair?

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